Secret's Out: How I Edit My Photos

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Instagram launched an update last week that now enables its users to pinch-zoom in on photos and disables its users to accidentally like a photo their ex posted 54 weeks ago. While we all sit very still waiting for the day we can finally rearrange our feeds, here's a guide I've finally put together about my go-to-image-editing-apps for the photos I post on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook. Unless it's editorial content for Street Style Teller taken by my talented photographer-friends, everything has been taken with my phone. In my opinion, there are shadows to be brightened and color to be corrected.

1. Facetune

Facetune is the first app I put any photo through, with my favorite tool under the Filters option called Lighting. Out of all of the 17 possible color filters available, I only use one called Lighter. It essentially makes the photo brighter which is something I struggle with especially when I shoot something with no natural lighting. This tool allows you to adjust the brightness from 0 to 100 [real quick!] depending on what looks best. Another feature I use is called Whiten. This tool allows you to whiten shadows and desaturate an object that is white but is photographed yellow like in a flatlay for example. Another feature I use often is the Detail function. This tool allows you to enhance certain aspects of the photograph. I usually use this tool on details your eyes wouldn't necessarily notice in a photograph like text or marble details on the table.

2. Lightroom

My friend photographers would be more familiar with this app. Unlike the application on your desktop, this is more abbreviated and has an easier sliding menu option. My favorite is the Clarify tool. Unlike the Detail tool on Facetune, this one seems to produce more of a realistic, semi-professional looking edit rather than the cartoon-like edit Facetune can create when overdone. I also like the Contrast and Exposure tools on this app because it is more subtle in comparison to apps such as Afterlight.

3. Instagram

This is usually the last step to my photo edit process before posting on Instagram. I use the Warmth function in the Edit feature. I prefer the cooler tones rather than the warmer ones. The cooler tones tend to accentuate the aesthetic I'm looking for in a photograph. I also sometimes use the Highlight tool under the Color option. I usually overlay pink highlight and then adjust to the left depending on how it accentuates the photograph and pleases the eye.

And that's all there is to it, ladies and gents.

Hope I helped your photo editing needs in some way. Back to fashion week madness, I go.

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